Archive | June 2016

Daily Design: Day 181

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Platform, Dream and Surprise.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Dream Team

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Dream Team is a singleplayer platformer game about exploring people’s dreams.

The game takes place in a small rural village that’s become plagued with a disease that makes people fall into a coma. The main character has the ability to enter their dreams in order to cure them.

As such, each characters dream becomes a level in the game. Outside of these, the player can explore the village in the real-world in order to talk to characters and complete simple side quests. After completing certain dreams or side quests in the world, new characters may fall into comas, unlocking new levels to complete. When a level is completed the person awakens, but the player can revisit any completed level (in order to hunt down collectibles) by sleeping in their own bed.

Every dream comes with a mechanical twist based on the character that’s dreaming. For example, a child will have much more imaginative and bizarre dreams, meaning that the world will be fractured and illogical. A character that feels trapped in their life may have a dream in which the player can fly.

Lastly, there are also Nightmares, which are optional super-hard levels for completionists. These tend to have a horror-focus on top of extreme difficulty and no collectibles, but unlock special character interactions and scenes if they can be beaten.

There are also cosmetic upgrades to be unlocked by completing side quests, rescuing people and collecting items inside dreams. Cosmetic upgrades are clothes and equipment for the custom-created character.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

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Daily Design: Day 180

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Train, Six and Anarchy.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Six Shooter

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Six Shooter is a multiplayer shooter where 6 players compete to kill each other with armoured (and armed) trains. Every player is confined to the same network of tracks, though they all start at very different ends of it.

Trains can fire to either side, like an 18th century ship. While they can also fire directly forward, the front-facing cannon does relatively very little damage. The best way to deal damage to enemies, though, is to ram them – ramming their side will immediately destroy them, and ramming from behind will do huge damage (tee hee). In a head-on collision, both trains are destroyed.

Cannons will deal damage according to where they hit – hitting a train from the front or back does huge damage, and hitting them on the side does relatively little. Side cannons can’t be manually aimed, but if they manage to hit a cannon it will be disabled for the remainder of the match. The front-facing cannon can be aimed manually, and while it doesn’t do much damage it can be used to easily destroy equipment on enemy trains.

To get around, players can utilize turntables scattered about the map. Staying on one lets them rotate in any direction until they’re aligned with a track, which lets players move more tactically. While there are quite a few turntables to use, your train is quite vulnerable while using one.

Finally, after a short time period the map will begin to close in. Tracks will be dramatically uprooted and fly into the air, an effect that begins at the furthest edge of the map and works its way inward. This is used to make sure matches don’t run for too long, especially when it comes down to just two players.

This is also a game that lends itself well to cosmetic rewards, as trains are easily and heavily customisable. Playing games online should reward an in-game currency that can be spent on cosmetics, though winning shouldn’t grant significantly more than losing. This is a game about having a fun, chaotic mess of a time, so winning should never be the priority over simply having a crazy match.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept. 

 

Daily Design: Day 179

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Smashing, Fog and Vehicle.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Fog Light

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Fog Light is a multiplayer racing game with a few abnormalities.

The most obvious of these is that the map is always extremely foggy. This means that players either have to drive slowly or react very quickly to avoid hitting objects or accidentally going off-road. A first-person view is also forced, so players can only see what’s directly in front of their car.

The biggest change, though, is that players both start from different positions and have different finish lines.  The game will always give you a rough idea of where your finish line is, but getting to it in the fog is much more difficult.

More than that, a serious crash results in elimination from the game rather than just a time penalty. This means that players really have to balance driving carefully with driving quickly – especially since opposing players can be driving towards them from the fog.

It’s likely a hard thing to balance – if the fog is too thick then skill becomes a much lesser part of the equation and luck comes to the front. If the fog is too thin, the entire mechanic is rendered moot. Finding that sweet spot where luck is a factor mitigated by skill would be ideal.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 178

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Explosive, Perspective and Scan.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Perspective Predicament

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Perspective Predicament is a single-player game about bomb disposal. The game is broken down into short, puzzle-centric levels.

The game is about defusing bombs in a short time limit (before they explode), which is done by rotating the bomb and basically just fucking around with it, if I’m honest. Most pieces on the bomb can be interacted with, even if they’re not useful. The wrong wire or button can cause the bomb to detonate prematurely, which instantly results in failure, as you’d imagine.

It’s a game about trial and error more than any kind of expertise, and the best players are the ones that have practiced certain levels. Because each level has a different explosive device, they also have very different methods of defusal.

Players also earn a “rank” based on their speed, with the highest rank being earnable by completing the level extremely quickly. While this is fairly straightforward for the early levels, remembering the exact process becomes a lot more difficult as the bombs become more complex, and the later levels require several steps to complete.

Earning high ranks will unlock secret levels that are extremely complicated, and automatically turn off any kind of UI help, such as glows or glimmers that show which piece/s of the bomb can be interacted with.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 177

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Crushing, Helicopter and Cursor.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Helicrusher

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Helicrusher is a game about crushing things with a helicopter, as the name may imply.

The game is 2D, and the player controls a single helicopter on the screen. Their goal is to crush as many objects and people as possible, each of which will increase their score. If the helicopter is destroyed (either by running into things directly or by being attacked) then the game ends.

The helicopter is controlled with the mouse. Holding down left click makes the helicopter fly upwards, and releasing it causes it to drop. Right clicking forces the helicopter to drop suddenly to the bottom of the screen, though this can only be done once every few seconds. The helicopter will move towards the mouse cursor as long it’s airborne.

By landing on top of something, the player will crush it and generate some points. After a level ends the player can spend points on upgrading their helicopter, including things like armour and movement speed.

The game will become increasingly more difficult the longer the player survives, and eventually enemies that fire will arrive. The helicopter can’t take damage from below, but it can’t survive many shots from other directions. Not long after that, other flying enemies are introduced, which obviously aren’t as easy to crush (and can shoot you from above!).

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept. 

Daily Design: Day 176

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Shooting, Challenge and Justice.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Trigger Happy

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Trigger Happy is a simple multiplayer game about shooting each other, which as far as I know is something games have never done before.

Each game is a short first-person match in which players don’t move. Instead, they’re standing and facing each other. After a short (and randomised) count down, the players have to draw their guns and shoot each other.

Firstly, the count down – it’s a random timer between two set values (say, 5 seconds to 20 seconds) and the timer can end anywhere in that timeframe. When it does end, the word “Draw” appears, and the players can then draw their guns.

This is done by a slightly random quick-time event. A series of three random keys or buttons appears, and the players have to press them in order to draw their gun. Once they’ve done that, they can aim and shoot like in any other FPS.

If one player lands a headshot or manages to shoot the other player’s gun out of their hand before they’ve landed a shot of their own, that player is declared the winner. Otherwise, it’s whoever inflicts the most damage with their 6 shots. This means that matches can often end with each player riddled with holes.

Players have a full minute after the “Draw” is sounded to shoot, which means the timer is rarely the deciding factor. It’s likely that if one player has fired all 6 rounds with poor accuracy, the other player can take their time to line up a headshot. This means that accuracy is just as important in speed.

Being shot also impairs your aiming, as you could imagine. Being hit in the leg forces you to drop to a knee, and being shot in the gun-holding arm will make your aim sway.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 175

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on randomly generated words. Today, they are; 

Umbrella, Purge and Leap.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Under Cover

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Under Cover is a platformer/puzzle game, set in a world where rain is lethal.

The game is a 2D sidescroller, broken into short levels. The goal of each level is to reach an exit while avoiding both the rain and any enemies along the way. Players have no way to directly defend themselves, but they can manipulate the environment via magnetic powers (like a really feeble Magneto).

Players can move metal objects along predetermined paths from anywhere in the level. Some of these stay where they’re put, but others will slowly move back to where they were originally. The goal is generally to manipulate the level in order to reach the goal without ever being rained on.

Enemies can also be killed by removing their cover and making the rain land on them, though players need to be aware that they don’t make important areas impassable. Because this is possible, levels can be restart at the press of a button.

As the game continues, players gain access to new abilities, such as the ability to temporarily “freeze” metal objects, sticking them in place. This can be useful for objects that slide back into place after a short time, allowing players to get them into position and then freeze them for some extra time. It can also be used to temporarily deactivate mechanical machinery.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.