Archive | May 2016

Daily Design: Day 152

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Crushing, Boom and Modification.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Reigny Day

8BmhfhO.jpg

Reigny Day is a singleplayer tower defense designed for phones. In the game, players defend their castle from oncoming hordes by tapping on them, which crushes them instantly.

The game is more isometric than top-down, with the castle itself at the bottom of the screen and the enemies coming from the top and moving down. As the game progresses, enemies become more difficult and varied, but all of which are simply trying to destroy the castle gate and gain entry.

When an enemy unit arrives at the castle wall, they’ll start attacking, which lowers the castle’s durability. At zero, the castle falls and the player loses. This can be prevented by crushing the enemy, but it also recovers completely at the end of each level.

Crushing enemies also generates gold, which can be used between levels to upgrade the castle. Levels can be replayed indefinitely to earn more gold, and if the player fails a level they keep all the gold they’ve earned throughout that attempt.

There are several upgrades, from upgrading crush damage to training archers that will slowly pick off enemy troops of their own volition. The castle itself can be upgraded, not only increases it’s durability but also the appearance. Another upgrade increases the amount of gold generated per kill.

Enemy types are important, and should be prioritized accordingly. Bomb-carrying enemies are especially dangerous, and will explode when killed – this deals massive damage to all nearby enemies, but also to the castle walls if it happens to be close enough. Faster enemies also tend to be weaker, so should be taken out first (or left to the castle archers).

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 151

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Swing, Damage and Protest.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Demonstration Demolition

635878964030029319-637742711_destruction___by_roiter475-d5e05ew.jpg

In Demonstration Demolition, players take the role of a disgruntled protester. In lieu of regular protesting methods, they’ve decided to just destroy everything (with a mace). As such, players spend almost all of their time with the game smashing as much as they possibly can.

From an isometric perspective, players are tasked with dealing as much damage to the city and environment as they can in a small time limit. They do this by spinning their character, which spins their mace, which breaks things (in case you weren’t sure on the exact functions of maces).

The character is made to spin by holding a button (or holding on the screen), and will slowly accelerate. Movement is done by swiping or using an analogue stick; remember, though, the faster they’re spinning the harder they are to control. As they spin, the speed, reach and damage of the mace will increase.

The trick, then, is to balance speed and damage by controlling the rate at which the character spins. The more destruction the player manages to cause in the time limit, the higher their score – this translates directly to in-game currency, which can be used to improve the character. Things like the mace’s chain (reach), ball (damage) and speed can be improved a huge amount, though it’s slow going.

New levels are unlocked by reaching a certain level of destruction in the previous one, with optional hidden levels found by destroying certain (very durable) objects.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 150

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Protecting, Flood and Intervention.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Catchment 22

Flood_in_Prague_2013,_Koželužská_street_with_sand_bags.JPG

Catchment 22 is a mobile game designed to be played in short bursts for a single player.

In it, the player must protect key sections of a town as it floods by strategically placing sandbags. Using a top-down perspective, players can see where the flood is coming from initially and choose which streets to block with their (limited supply of) sandbags.

Tapping anywhere on the map will place sandbags at that location, but remember that water will always try to redirect itself rather than simply stopping. The goal is to navigate the water away from the protected areas and safely out of the city.

One of the challenges about this is that the sandbag supplies are limited, meaning that players can’t simply sandbag every area around where they’re trying to protect. Instead, players should think ahead to see where the water will run once it’s redirected, as sandbags can’t be removed once the water’s touched them.

The game is broken into several levels that escalate in difficulty and complexity. Each of these levels has three ranks to earn, the best of which is earned by using the minimum number of sandbags. Earning high ranks unlocks especially difficult secret levels.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 149


Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Arena, Bet and Legend.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Dead Heat

gladiator-other.jpg

Dead Heat is a singleplayer “roguelite” management game, in which players manage a gladiator as they rise through the ranks and try to earn their freedom.

Initially, the player is given a slave to manage. The goal is to train and manage the slave as they become famous warriors, eventually either earning their freedom or dying (permanently) in the arena.

The gladiator is randomly generated, with their own “traits”. These traits can be things like “Bloodthirsty”, which pushes the fighter to go for the killing blow even when it isn’t necessary or wise to do so. Another is “Timid”, which makes them less aggressive and much less likely to do something crowd-pleasing.

These traits are generated when the slave is created, but they can also be changed, earned or lost in the arena. A fighter that’s nearly killed may become more timid, whereas a gladiator who wins many easy fights may become overconfident.

The fights themselves are automatic, and the player just has to watch them unfold (or skip them and view the results). Fights play out according to how well trained and equipped the gladiator is, and if they die, that’s it – the player will have to manage a new slave from scratch.

The player, however, never dies. They continue to amass money and skills of their own, which help to train each subsequent gladiator more easily. As the player increases their own “Renown” by winning matches, the gladiators that are created for them have better starting stats, and eventually players may be recruiting volunteers, soldiers or veteran gladiators rather than slaves.

If a gladiator wins a certain number of fights, they may be retired. In the case of slaves, they will be automatically granted their freedom, though bloodthirsty slaves may choose to stay on as a gladiator. Successfully training a warrior to freedom results in a large bonus of renown and gold for the player.

Players can also choose to retire their own gladiators at any time, though it’s not necessarily wise to do so. Retiring a gladiator early results in a small loss of renown and no earned gold, but the loss is much worse if the gladiator dies in combat. There’s another option, however – players can choose to bet on a match. This is typically used to earn bonus gold by betting on their own fighter, can crafty players can put a weak gladiator into a match and bet big on the competition.

This results in a large bonus to gold, but also a huge loss of renown. Gold can be used to buy new equipment, which is retained if a gladiator dies but can also be broken in combat (especially by careless warriors).

Finally, there’s training. Between matches the player has to decide how to train their gladiator, by increasing certain stats, such as strength, speed or health. Different gladiators will earn stats at increased rates depending on their traits – the key is to focus on the best stats and equipment for a given gladiator.

For example, a heavy-set gladiator won’t benefit much from speed training, but will get a lot more out of strength. Similarly, they’re better suited to wielding an axe than a whip.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

 

Daily Design: Day 148

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Giant, Fight and Sport.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Big Serving

Pro-tennis-2.jpg

Big Serving is a tennis game with a twist – when hitting the ball, players can choose to either shrink or enlarge it.

This is done by switching “modes”. Players are either in “Enlarge” or “Shrink” mode, denoted by their character model displaying as red or blue, respectively. Every hit done in this mode will affect the ball, with more powerful hits resulting in a larger change. The ball will also continue to be affected until it’s hit again, albeit more slowly.

Smaller balls will travel faster and be a lot harder to hit and see, though this of course goes for every player. Larger balls are considerably slower and don’t travel as far, but if they get large enough can be completely impossible to hit, resulting in a guaranteed point. Many players may choose to balance the ball and try to keep it as normal as possible.

The player’s mode also influences their character. Enlarge mode makes their character bigger and slower, but also improves their reach. Shrink mode makes them a lot faster, but reduces their reach in turn. Modes can be changed at will, though there’s a brief (probably half a second) cooldown between changing.

Otherwise, it’s a normal tennis game. Players can curve the ball, hit it up, smash it straight across, and so on (in case it isn’t obvious yet, I don’t know many tennis terms). The rules are the same as regular tennis.

Other trappings could include online multiplayer, offline modes (tournaments, “career” mode, so on) and more. Cosmetic upgrades could easily be introduced, as could unlockable courts. Another fairly simple idea would be a “puzzle” mode, where players are given non-conventional rules, such as seeing how many times they can hit an accelerating ball against a wall before they miss, or trying to hit the ball through different sized holes.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 147

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Dispose, Gear and End.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Cleanup Crew

thief-burglar-robber-986494420.jpg

Cleanup Crew is an asymmetrical multiplayer game about cleaning up a crime scene.

Players take the role of either “Cleaners”or “Cops”, who have very different roles from one another. Cleaners are trying to hide the details of a crime scene, and Cops are trying to figure those details out.

As Cleaners, players explore a crime scene in first-person and carry multiple tools to try and hide what’s happened. For example, there may be a body in the lounge room. Cleaners can drag this body into another room or try to hide it somewhere (such as in a cupboard). Doing so creates a blood trail which must also be cleaned. Cleaners have 60 seconds to clean a crime scene, then they can “upload” it.

Cops can download levels that have been cleaned and try to solve the case in 60 seconds. While exploring they can mark items that they’re looking at, which comes in handy later. It’s their job to figure out as much as possible in the time limit; once the timer expires, they’re given a short quiz on the crime. It asks questions like “where did the murder occur”, “what gender was the victim” and so on.

Cleaners are awarded points for every player that fails an uploaded level, while Cops are awarded points for every successfully solved case (in which they managed to answer all the quiz questions correctly, though they’re given a single chance to get a question wrong). These points can be spent on new tools that open up in-game options, though only one tool can be equipped in any given round.

For Cleaners, these are things like “blood bombs” that can be used to cover a room in blood, obscuring any details. Cops get more typical items like a UV light that can be used to discover blood that’s been cleaned away and is otherwise invisible.

Not all crimes are murders, either. Some are robberies, in which players have to disguise what was stolen and where it was stolen from. Crimes are randomly generated, though maps are not. The asymmetrical nature of the game means that players can always enter a game, even if another player isn’t.

Design is all about iteration, so were this to be developed it’s important to note that it would be very subject to change, especially in things like the time limit. Just remember that the numbers I use are generally arbitrary – a 60 second time limit may change drastically, or even be removed entirely.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.

Daily Design: Day 146

Daily Design is a series of game concepts devised daily through all of 2016. These are just basic concepts, designed based on three randomly generated words. Today, they are;

Holiday, Survival and Lions.

As such, the game I’ve designed today is…

Last Resort

PAP-690x380-Resort-Molokai-Pool-01.jpg

Last Resort is a cooperative multiplayer game for up to 12 players. In the game, players band together to survive in a jungle until help arrives.

After their resort is overrun by vicious animals, the players are stranded in a jungle, alone. The game uses an isometric view, and the player can move around with a keyboard or joystick. Players should try to avoid creatures until they can band together and defend themselves until help arrives.

Players have no idea where the others are when the game begins. However, it’s possible to craft items that help, such as a campfire that gives off smoke or they even find a flare gun. These create a marker on the map, though cheaper items (such as the campfire) will create a large radius on the map, meaning some exploration is still required.

Crafting is absolutely essential to the game, and is the player’s main way of defense. Because the characters can’t fight, they must either run or hide when attacked, and will die very quickly in head-to-head combat. While they can eventually craft weapons, these are intended to be a last resort rather than an object of aggression.

Sticks and stones can be gathered initially, and from there an axe can be made to chop down trees for better wood. Following this process, players can slowly upgrade their crafting toolset and gear, eventually building automated defenses and fences. The idea is to find the other players, reach a defensible spot and hold out until help arrives.

Certain animals (not all of which are necessarily real-life creatures) will prove very difficult for even the most well-defended stronghold, and escaping to rebuild is often necessary.

Help will arrive after a certain time limit, which is selectable from a menu. The time limit determines crafting and movement speed as well, so each game should feel roughly the same in terms of progression regardless of the time limit. Timers range from 15 minutes to two hours.

There’s also a day/night cycle, which can either help or hinder. At night players can’t see as far, meaning creatures can appear suddenly. However, players can also hide in bushes (from some animals) at night time, which is very helpful when necessary.

Finally, an extraction helicopter will arrive, but it will choose a random spot on the map and will only notify players a minute or two before it arrives. This means that players should prepare to travel to the point and head out as soon as possible, because the helicopter only waits a few minutes.

Players can find pieces of equipment in the jungle which can be worn, though it’s entirely cosmetic. What gear appears is determined by difficulty, and players are guaranteed a piece of gear when they escape successfully. When a player finds a gear piece, every surviving player in the match is awarded one, regardless of whether or not they were nearby.

That’s it! Thanks for reading. I’ll be back tomorrow with another quick game concept.